Question: When Would You Use A 50mm Lens?

What aperture should I use for family portraits?

f/4.0As a rule of thumb, though, we tend to hang out at f/4.0 for most of family portrait time and keep the groupings smaller, because even though we give up some of the bokeh in the background compared to f/2.8, we’ll trade that for guaranteed in-focus family shots any day of the week..

Can you use a 50mm lens for landscapes?

Landscapes usually require very good sharpness, and the 50mm prime lenses excel at that. … As with most lenses, its sweet spot isn’t wide open, but more in the f/4 to f/5.6 range. Even narrower apertures will still yield excellent results. The 50mm prime allows you to capture very sharp images.

What is the difference between 35mm and 50mm lens?

The bokeh is also noticeably creamier with the 50mm over the 35mm. The slight difference in compression between the two is apparent with the branch in the 35mm image looking longer while the 50mm image looks compacted. When holding the two lenses, the major difference is the weight and construction.

Is a 50mm lens good for portraits?

For portrait photography, 50mm lenses are great for full-length and waist-level portraits, both on location and in the studio. This is thanks to the wide field of view compared to an 85mm or 135mm lens, and you don’t need to be too far away from the model to achieve these crops.

Can you use a 50mm lens for family portraits?

Remember this: “The ideal focal length range for portraits (faces) in full-frame cameras is from 50mm to 135mm.” Anything less or more, and their faces will be distorted. Anything wider than 50mm and narrower than 135mm distorts their face and makes them look ugly.

Is a 50mm lens good for macro?

Macro magnification and other lens options It can actually be done with any lens but a 50mm will give you a 1:1 or true macro scale image. Long lenses will not give you as much magnification and wide angle lenses will give you more (28mm is about 3:1).

Which is better 85mm or 50mm?

Using an 85mm lens will result in an image that is more closely framed on your subject. On the other hand, shooting with the 50mm lens will result in an image that includes more of the background (though not nearly as much as shooting with the Canon 24mm lens). … In that case, you may want to consider the 85mm lens.

What is a 50mm lens used for?

50mm lenses are fast lenses with a fast maximum aperture. The most basic 50mm lenses are typically F1. 8 – a very wide aperture. This means they are great for low-light photography (e.g. low-light portraiture or indoor shooting) as they allow more light into the camera’s sensor.

Can you zoom with a 50mm lens?

With 50mm prime lenses, instead of zooming with your hand, you will zoom with your feet. You’ll get closer to your subject to isolate it from a distracting background, which will mostly be abstract shapes (especially if you have the f/1.4 version).

How far away should a 50mm lens be?

The minimum distance is calculated from the camera’s focal plane mark, typically found near the shooting mode dial. Most DSLR cameras will mark this point with a line through a circle (pictured below). The Nikon 50mm f/1.8g lens has a minimum focusing distance of 0.45m/1.5ft from the focal plane mark.