Should Small Children Attend Funerals?

What age is appropriate for a child to attend a funeral?

If you like you can ask your funeral director for their advice.

Often families choose not to take babies and children under the age of about 3, as they are concerned that they might be noisy.

Children old enough to know what is happening should generally be given the choice to attend and their decision respected..

Should I bring my 4 year old to a funeral?

As soon as children are able to sit still or react appropriately at family events, they should be given a choice about funerals. Funerals are important family rituals.

How do you explain a funeral to a 5 year old?

Encourage your children to go to the funeral or memorial service. Explain that you are a family and this is an important family event. Let them know that you expect them to go with you….Touch the person or the casket if they want to.Draw a picture.Visit with guests.Share memories of the person who has died.

Should you take a 10 year old to a funeral?

There is no right or wrong answer. But offering your child the option to go is one opportunity for them to say ‘goodbye’ to a special person. … But most children have a full understanding of death by the time they are about 8-10 years old and many younger children will have enough understanding to go to the funeral.

How do you explain a coffin to a child?

Tell them that everyone will drive to the cemetery where the casket will be buried. Explain to them that everyone will gather around the grave, a special hole that is a dug in the ground, to say prayers and to place flowers on the casket. Explain cremation if the body will be cremated.

How do you explain a cemetery to a child?

Explain Where You Are The first visit is a fine opportunity to teach the purpose of a cemetery. You might explain it as a place to remember and honor those who have died. Connecting the deceased with a physical location may help your child understand that someone he loved didn’t just suddenly disappear.

Is it bad luck to put photos in a coffin?

Placing notes, photos, drawings, or anything else in the casket is a sign of love and will not change your luck, karma or anything similar in any way. … There is no such thing as bad luck, and it is not wrong to place things in a coffin…… unless they are of great value, could be sold and the money put to some good use.

Is it wrong to wear white to a funeral?

As a neutral color, white should not be considered inappropriate at most North American funerals. Though you should ask the family hosting the service when in doubt, plain, neutral colors are generally acceptable for memorials. Wearing white in conjunction with other dark tones is absolutely appropriate.

How do you tell a child their grandparent is dying?

How can I tell them and what should I say?Ask someone else to be there:Use language they can understand:Go at their pace:Try not to look uncomfortable:Don’t worry if you become upset:Tell them they can’t change what’s happening:Check what they know and understand:Encourage your child to ask questions:More items…

How do you tell a child they are dying?

Acknowledge guilt Sometimes, it can help to give your child “permission” to talk about dying, simply by saying – “I’m ok to talk about this if you want to. I’m here for you”. If they find it easier to talk to someone outside the family, the palliative care team could help.

When should you not go to a funeral?

Unless the family wants the funeral or memorial service to be private, you are welcome to attend. If you are close to the bereaved or the deceased, live close by and have no extenuating circumstances, then, by all means, go to the funeral. In fact, if you don’t go, your presence may be missed.

Is it appropriate to bring a child to a funeral?

As a general guideline, children should be allowed to attend a wake, funeral and burial if they want to. They can also be involved in the funeral planning. Joining family members for these rituals gives the child a chance to receive grief support from others and say goodbye in their own way to the person who has died.

How do you tell a 6 year old a parent died?

Helping Your Child Deal With DeathWhen talking about death, use simple, clear words. … Listen and comfort. … Put emotions into words. … Tell your child what to expect. … Talk about funerals and rituals. … Give your child a role. … Help your child remember the person. … Respond to emotions with comfort and reassurance.More items…

How do you explain a funeral to a 7 year old?

Clear words such as ‘he has died’ are easier for children to understand than ‘lost’ ‘passed away’ or ‘gone to the stars’. Allow for time together for comfort, support and any questions they may ask. Answer questions honestly, but keep explanations short, clear and appropriate for their age and understanding.

How do you tell a child their sibling has died?

Share Your Feelings Tell your children how sad you are, or that you feel angry or confused. Again, use simple language. Share your feelings, but don’t make your children your sounding board. You want to show how to talk about their feelings, not burden them with your adult grief.

Should a child view an open casket?

For instance, if there will be a viewing with an open casket, the child needs to know that. The child also needs to know that it’s OK to touch their parent’s body, but they should not be made to do so. The child may want to give something to the parent, by putting it in the casket, the ground, or the cremation urn.

What do you bring to a child’s funeral?

Bringing a meal, sending a card or remembering the baby’s birthday and other special events extend your support past the actual day of the funeral. Keep in mind that most parents never get over the death of a child.

How can parents prepare their child for a funeral?

Prepare them in advance Discuss what your child will see (pews, religious symbols, flowers, casket, urn, the body of the deceased, black clothing, etc.). You don’t have to talk about everything at once – do it in small doses. The point is to put any anxiety to rest and prepare your child for a new experience.